04 November 2015

Respecting Buddhist Monks in Thailand

Like in most other Theravada nations, Buddhism Thailand is represented primarily by the presence of Buddhist monks, who serve as officiants on ceremonial occasions, as well as being responsible for preserving and conveying the teachings of the Buddha.

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, temple, wat, Bangkok, religion, culture, face, eye contact

























Many monks in Thailand begin their careers by serving as temple boys. They are traditionally no younger than eight and do minor housework. The primary reason for becoming a temple boy is to gain a basic education, particularly in basic reading and writing and the memorisation of the scriptures chanted on ritual occasions. Prior to the creation of state-run primary schools in Thailand, village temples aka wats served as the primary form of education for most Thai boys. Service in a temple as a temple boy was a necessary prerequisite for attaining any higher education, and was the only learning available to most Thai peasants.

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, temple boy, temple, wat, Phetchaburi, religion, culture, face, eye contact
Temporary ordination is the norm among Thai Buddhists. Most young men traditionally ordain for the term of a single rainy season aka vassa. Those who remain monks beyond their first vassa typically remain monks for between one and three years, officiating at religious ceremonies in surrounding villages and possibly receiving further education in reading and writing. After this period of one to three years, most young monks return to lay life, going on to marry and begin a family. Young men in Thailand who have undergone ordination are seen as being more suitable partners for marriage; unordained men are euphemistically called "unripe", while those who have been ordained are said to be "ripe". A period as a monk is a prerequisite for many positions of leadership within the village hierarchy. 

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, Bangkok, temple, wat, religion, culture, face, eye contact
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, temple, wat, Bangkok, religion, culture, face, eye contact
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, posing, low-angle shot, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, temple, wat, Bangkok, religion, culture, face, eye contact

























The Thai tradition supports laymen to go into a monastery, dress and act as monks, and study while there. The time line is based on threes, staying as a monk for three days, or three weeks, or three months or three years, or example of three weeks and three days. This retreat is expected of all male Thai, rich or poor, and often is scheduled after high school. Such retreat brings honor to the family and blessings aka merit to the young man.

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, smiling, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, Bangkok, religion, culture, face, eye contact
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, posing, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, tattoo, upper arm, temple, wat, Chiang Rai, face, eye contact Monks who do not return to lay life typically specialise in either scholarship or meditation. Those who specialise in scholarship typically travel to regional education centers to begin further instruction in the Pāli language and the scriptures, and may then continue on to the major monastic universities located in Bangkok. The route of scholarship is also taken by monks who desire to rise in the ecclesiastic hierarchy, as promotions within the government-run system is contingent on passing examinations in Pāli and Dhamma studies

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, praying, Bangkok, religion, culture
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, praying, Bangkok, religion, culture
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, posing, Thailand, Buddhism, Buddhist monk, orange robe, shaved head, saffron robe, Theravada Buddhism, bhikkhu, temple, Bangkok, religion, culture, face, eye contact

























Unlike in Burma and Sri Lanka, the bhikkhuni lineage of women monastics was never established in Thailand. Women primarily participate in religious life either as lay participants in collective merit-making rituals or by doing domestic work around temples. A small number of women choose to become maechi, non-ordained religious specialists who permanently observe either the Eight Precepts or the Ten Precepts. Maechi do not receive the level of support given to bhikkhu and their position in the Thai society is the subject of current discussion.

© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, shaved head, Theravada Buddhism, maechi, temple, wat, kitchen, apron, Phatthalung, beautiful, smiling, religion, culture, face, eye contact
© Matt Hahnewald, Facing the World, people, portrait, street portrait, Thailand, Buddhism, shaved head, Theravada Buddhism, maechi, temple, wat, kitchen, apron, Phatthalung, beautiful, smiling, religion, culture, face, eye contact



























Portrait photographs of Thai Buddhist monks in Matt Hahnewald's
Portrait Photographs of Tibetan-Buddhist monks in Matt Hahnewald's

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